Thesis Sketchbook Montage

Thesis Sketchbook Montage

Statement:  By dismissing ubiquitous notions of idyllic nature, we are free to reconsider the authenticity of our waste, and how the 'ugly' might be re-purposed using biological [synthetic or otherwise] processes to terraform our waste into a monumental landscape machine that serves as a perpetual function of the city.

Abstract:

We are a geologic force.

We make marks visible from space.

We can create our own geology.

This proposal is a designed geologic cycle, the geology being waste.
More specifically dredge material from New York harbor, and fly ash from incinerated solid waste.

I designed a mountain that breathes the city’s waste,
and fuels its growth.

These materials come together and through a process of accumulation, sorting, piling, bio-remediation, and solidification through bacterial calcification,  over time, grow into mountain.

The mountain has no finality. The pressure and compression caused by its growth create stone. Stone that will be harvested as the main building material for the city, completing the cycle.

Waste to mountain, mountain to stone, stone to building........

I am unapologetic to this growth and to waste.

This thesis explores waste not as marginal byproduct of a city’s function, but as an integral and perpetual metabolic component.

Infrastructure as inhabitable organism. Landscape as Machine.

I question ubiquitous ideas of nature, especially in the city.

We can design our own neo-nature.

This is first done by either dismissing, or accepting everything, as nature.

This thesis is a study of this dismissal.

 

ASLA_2012_Submission3.jpg
adam e. anderson_construction timeline_ii.jpg

adam e. anderson_construction timeline_ii.jpg

adam e. anderson_mountain formation.jpg

adam e. anderson_mountain formation.jpg

adam e. anderson_slag heap angle study_flat.jpg

adam e. anderson_slag heap angle study_flat.jpg

adam e. anderson_pressures and deformations_flat.jpg

adam e. anderson_pressures and deformations_flat.jpg

ASLA_2012_Submission.jpg
ASLA_2012_Submission9.jpg
adam e. anderson_thesis diagrams.jpg

adam e. anderson_thesis diagrams.jpg

Site Cross-Section

Site Cross-Section

adam e. anderson_fly by_2_flat.jpg

adam e. anderson_fly by_2_flat.jpg

the edge wider_flat.jpg

the edge wider_flat.jpg

adam e. anderson_pile field_flat.jpg

adam e. anderson_pile field_flat.jpg

In the Canyon

In the Canyon

As the mountain grows, the terrain transforms into a network of canyons that become deeper and deeper. The bottom mountain edges inform planting schemes. The erosion from the mountain is joined with organic compost material, and thick plantings of fast growing bamboo [which also acts as a soil remediator], and this edge quickly becomes green, and adds the to darkening and mystery of the canyon. Steam from the decomposing organic material creates a fog, limiting distant views and partially masking monstrous waste sculptures. Machines operate up and down the mountain in the distance above. You feel a sense of complete disconnect from the city.

adam e. anderson_top of the world_flat.jpg

adam e. anderson_top of the world_flat.jpg

ASLA_2012_Submission11.jpg